Book Review | Counting Stars

written by Wenlock Books bookseller Jasmine

Counting Stars by Keris Stainton
Publisher: Hot Key Books
Genre: Young Adult
Pages: 336
Format: Paperback
Price: £6.99

Anna's finally ready to be a 'proper' grown-up. She couldn't be more excited about her big move to Liverpool, and she's determined to bring more of her super-confident online alter-ego, Anna Sparks, with her. 

But her new life is also a little overwhelming.  Anna's job quickly falls through, and then she realises that although her new friends are great, they're also a little mixed-up...and it's not long before Anna starts using her blog to talk about her experiences, from the hilarious to the ridiculous to the little-bit-scary. But when Anna spills a bigger secret than she can handle, suddenly the consequences are all too real.

Counting Stars is the perfect example of fabulous contemporary YA: it's rude, funny, heartwarming, heartbreaking, captivating, and completely embracing of late-teens/early twenties culture. Anna is the main character - although this isn't told in first-person - and her friends make up a full and interesting cast of secondary characters. I really enjoyed that all of the characters feel rounded and as a result this is such an easy read.

Despite there being a main character, there are multiple storylines touching upon issues from all of the characters perspectives. Keris has done a marvellous job of interweaving all of these narratives into an exciting story that feels very real and true to life. The use of third person narrative makes this book really quirky - the only book I can think to compare this to is the Confessions of Georgia Nicolson series, although these are aimed at a slightly older audience.

Something that I really love about Counting Stars is the variety of characters and that each of their sexualities and attitudes towards sex is celebrated. Gay relationships, casual sex and being a virgin are all issues explored sensitively and in a manner that, rightfully, suggests that all of these are normal. I especially liked that Anna isn't shamed for being a virgin because so often YA focusses on normalising teens who have sex, sometimes to the point of suggesting that all teenagers are and should be having sex.

It's unusual to find a YA novel that covers family, friends, secrets, university, money, moving out, growing-up, independence, relationships and sex, death and careers as sensitively and brilliantly as Counting Stars does. I really, really recommend this book to anyone looking for something super-duper to read!