Book Review | The Wrong Train

written by Wenlock Books bookseller Jasmine

The Wrong Train by Jermey de Quidt
Publisher: David Fickling Books
Genre: Young Adult
Pages: 220
Format: Hardback
Price: £10.99

The Wrong Train by Jeremy de Quidt is a collection of creepy short stories joined together by a central plot. It’s the first book that I’ve read by Jeremy de Quidt and I really, really enjoyed it.

It’s late. Dark. A boy rushes to catch a train, leaping aboard just before it pulls away. Suddenly he realises that it’s the wrong train. He’s annoyed of course, but not scared…Yet. He gets off at the next station, but the platform’s empty, and it doesn’t look like any station he’s seen before. But he’s still not scared…Yet. Then a stranger arrives – someone with stories to help pass the time. Only these aren’t any old stories. These are nightmares, and they come with a price to pay…Scared yet? You will be.

I love the concept of The Wrong Train because the central storyline of a man telling unsettling stories to a boy who is lost gives purpose to the collection of stories and allows the stories to be read as 1 book. I’ve not read a YA short story collection before but I loved the intensity that a condensed story is able to achieve and I also really enjoyed being able to read a whole story in one go, much like the boy who is hearing these stories. It’s interesting to hear that Jeremy always planned for The Wrong Train to include a central plot (instead of writing a collection and then deciding to tie it all together) saying:

‘The central plot, rather than the stories, was there from outset. The plan was always for a character to be told a series of stories. I had to frame it so that the character had nowhere to go and no choice but to listen to the stories, which is how we end up alone on a railway halt in the middle of the night. I wrote the stories first, one by one, and in the same order that they appear in the book and only then wrote the linking narrative to join them together. It was very much the case that the central plot came before the stories.’

I also really enjoyed the variety of the stories that Jeremy tells in this book. Even though all of the stories are set in the present day and centre a teenager, each story feels completely unique and very different from the others in the book. What is most impressive about The Wrong Train is how the everyday is twisted to become so frightening. From babysitting 2 young children to being home alone, Jeremy is able to play with the reader’s mind in so few pages but make an impression that stays for days:

‘One of my favourite master ghost short story writers is M.R.James. He wanted his scary stories to be contemporary and able to convince people that but for a bit of good fortune the awful events of the tale could happen to them. But he was writing at the turn of the last century and his model of Edwardian English ghost stories has become so popular that everyone now misses the point that he wanted them, and the whole point of them was, to be modern and everyday.
So, I wanted to set my stories not in distant Edwardian school holidays but in the here and now, and fill them with the normal everyday things and technology that we all have – then make that normality frightening.’

The inclusion of technology is another aspect of The Wrong Train that I loved, and I think it really adds to the thrilling and exciting nature of the stories. Jeremy weaves everyday technology into the stories in such a clever way that the terror felt by the characters in the The Wrong Train feels very close to home and left me wondering how I would cope in the same situations.

The Wrong Train is the perfect autumnal read – it’s dark, exciting and the each story is the perfect length for reading before bed or in a spare half an hour. I will definitely be seeking out more short story collections and look forward to reading more from Jeremy in the future!